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Saturday, September 22, 2018

Protections for Massachusetts Employees from Employer's Retaliation and Termination


Massachusetts is a an at-will employment state, meaning that employees can typically be fired at any time for any reason.  However, there are several important exceptions to this general rule which are important for employees who have been let go (or are in fear of being terminated from their employment) to know about.

First, there are certain protected activities under the Common Law that an employee cannot be fired because he or she engaged in said activity.  These activities including: (1) asserting a legal right (such as taking vacation time or filing a workers' compensation action), (2) fulfilling a legal duty (such as attending jury duty), (3) reporting criminal wrongdoing, (4) refusing to commit illegal acts (such as embezzling or committing perjury), and (5) cooperating in a criminal investigation of the employer or the employee's superiors.  Generally speaking, if an employee is engaged in these protected activities the employer cannot terminate him or her for doing so.
Read more . . .


Thursday, May 3, 2018

Rhode Island Goes Hands Free


If you have spent anytime driving on the highways of Rhode Island recently, you will have noticed the signs that on June 1, 2018, drivers in Rhode Island will need to put their phones down.  If not, drivers will face a one hundred dollar fine - each time they are caught.

Rhode Island state police have suggested that the dangers of distracted driving are the same as the dangers of drunk driving.  That is why beginning on June 1st, the police will be looking to pull over anyone holding their phone while they are talking and driving.  Drivers will be allowed to use the phone only with a hands-free devices, like a mount inside the car or a Bluetooth.


Read more . . .


Friday, October 20, 2017

The Future of Massachusetts Non-Competition Agreements

Most people have experience with non-competition agreements, whether they love them (generally employers) or hate them (generally employees). 

In 2016, both the Massachusetts House of Representatives and the Massachusetts Senate passed different versions of non-compete reform bills.  Unfortunately, by the end of the legislative session, they were unable to come to reach an agreement on non-compete reform.

In early 2017, a new non-compete bill was filed which grew out of earlier versions of legislation introduced in Massachusetts.  This bill, if passed, would make significant changes to non-competition law in Massachusetts.


Read more . . .


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