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Health Care Proxy

Thursday, August 25, 2022

Importance of a Health Care Proxy and Power of Attorney for College Freshmen


While a parent’s job may never be done, things get more complicated when that child begins his or her college career.  Parents often understand the importance of having a healthcare power of attorney in place for a spouse or aging parent, but often do not think about how crucial this document is for a recent high school graduate or young adult child.  Most college freshmen are eighteen years old which means they are legal adults and parents are no longer entitled to make decisions on their behalf.  This can cause a problem if there is a medical emergency.

Once a child turns eighteen, his or her parents no longer have any legal say over medical or financial decisions involving the child.
Read more . . .


Thursday, July 28, 2022

Ten Estate Planning Mistakes to Avoid


The loss of a loved one is always difficult, but that pain can be magnified when there is no proper estate planning in place.  The more complicated the family dynamics and the more specific the wishes of the loved one, the more important it is to make sure the proper estate planning is in place.  While you are enjoying the last month of summer and are sitting on the beach and thinking about the future, here are ten common estate planning mistakes to avoid.

1.  Not having a plan in place.
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Friday, September 24, 2021

Estate Planning for Unmarried Couples


Statistics show that couples are waiting longer and longer to get married.  In addition, there are many alternatives to marriage, such as domestic partnerships, that are becoming more normalized.  It is important for these couples to understand that there may be a stronger need for estate planning then there is for married couples.  Without proper estate planning, unmarried couples will not inherit or be able to make critical decisions for their significant other.

There are two general purposes to estate planning.
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Thursday, February 18, 2021

Testamentary Capacity


Testamentary Capacity

by Samuel S. Reidy, Esq.

February 18, 2021

Unfortunately, it has become an all-too-common story.  A loved one is stricken with dementia and during the period he or she does not have possession of all of their facilities, an estate planning change is suddenly made.  Sometimes this new (and often unexpected) estate planning means the changing of beneficiaries in a Will, or a new Health Care Proxy or Durable Power of Attorney being named, or the transfer of real estate.
Read more . . .


Friday, September 25, 2020

The Importance of a Health Care Proxy in Massachusetts


One of the three most basic estate planning documents is the health care proxy.  This is the document where an individual gives permission to another person to make health care decisions on their behalf in the event they are incapacitated or unable to make health care decisions for themselves.  This document is especially important in Massachusetts because under Massachusetts law, there is no identified law that allows for the appointment of a default surrogate under any circumstances.  That means that your spouse, parents, and children have no legal right to make health care decisions for you.

Massachusetts is in the minority with regards to the treatment of health care proxies.
Read more . . .


Sunday, December 30, 2018

Estate Planning Tips for the New Year


Every year, millions of people make their "New Year's Resolutions."  These resolutions can include accomplishing a personal goal or making a change to improve a person's everyday life.  In 2019, one such New Year's Resolution could be to work on your own estate planning goals and objectives.  To kick off 2019 correctly, I am offering three complimentary and useful estate planning tips.

1.
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Wednesday, June 20, 2018

The Importance of Estate Planning When the Kids Turn 18


A child going to college is widely considered the first major step for moving from childhood into adulthood.  However, many parents do not associate this milestone with a need to consider estate planning for the child.  The reality is once a child turns 18 years old, the parents no longer have any legal parental rights over the child.  To put it bluntly: once a child turns 18, his or her parents no longer have any legal say over medical or financial decisions involving the child.

Therefore, every child over the age of 18 should execute a Health Care Proxy and a Durable Power of Attorney.
Read more . . .


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